Menu
Spagnolo & Hoeksema, LLC
Representing Businesses And Their Owners Since 2002
847-584-3988

Hoffman Estates Business Law Blog

Your out-of-state vacation home can complicate probate

Many families have the goal of one day owning property in another state. Some families dream of a rustic cabin on a lake, while other families desire a vacation home somewhere warm. If you have made your family’s dream a reality, you may have some special considerations to factor in when estate planning.

Typically, if you own property in more than one state, your estate must go through probate in both states. After you pass away, your Illinois property will go through probate in Illinois, while your other property will go through ancillary probate in its state. Ancillary probate is a second or subsequent probate for your estate.

It is important to choose the right legal form for your business

Deciding on the legal structure is one of the most important decisions you will make when starting a business. You will probably decide on the legal structure early in the business formation process. However, your choice will have long-term impacts on the amount of taxes you pay, the amount of paperwork your business must complete and the amount of personal liability you may be responsible for.

There are several legal structures to choose from. Four of the most common types of structure include a sole proprietorship, a partnership, a corporation and a limited liability company (LLC).

Illinois is broke, so be alert to new taxes

As most of my clients that have heard me speak over the last 20 years can attest, I have been known to say, "Illinois is broke, so be alert to new taxes." One fact I have mentioned on several occasions is that Illinois does not impose income taxes on your retirement income, whereas most surrounding states do. This Illinois "loophole" has been the primary bright spot for this state when comparing it to the tax environments in neighboring states.

Business tax impact and implication

Regardless of the product or service a business provides, all companies share two common concerns: profits and losses. While people form businesses to meet a need, those companies revolve around making money. At a certain point, making money includes minimizing expenditures.

In any venture, you will pay taxes. According to Benjamin Franklin, they’re one of two things which can ever be certain in this world. And, though taxes serve the public good, they can take a toll. This is especially true for new, small or family-owned businesses.

Staggered distribution is important in high asset estate plans

If you have a large estate and minor children, it's important to consider how you might control your heirs' inheritance in case of a tragic event.

Staggered distribution trusts are common for young beneficiaries of high-asset estates, because they pay out over time -- keeping a young individual from becoming overwhelmed by a large sum coming all at once.

Should you write a business plan?

You may be an entrepreneur considering if you need to write a business plan. It sounds like a great idea. You would think any new business or idea may need a plan to be successful and you would be right. There are many reasons why you should make sure a proper business plan is on your to-do list.

A business plan is a list of goals for your business. It lists your plans for accomplishing the goals and says how they can be achieved. The business plan may also include information for possible investors, as well as, information on the organization’s background and the group trying to reach them.

Business owners should start planning for 2018 taxes now

Taxes can be a particularly frustrating part of running a business. Filing on behalf of a company is often much more complicated than the average personal tax return. Audits tend to be more of a hassle as well.

Because a higher value is likely at stake, many Illinois business owners spend ample resources making sure that taxes are under control. In light of the Republican-formed tax reform policy, you might have to direct your attention to the financial implications.

Three things to know about non-competition agreements

If you're a business owner, you have a vested interest in staying ahead of the competition. While you achieve this goal in many ways, having top-notch employees is paramount to your success. Talent pool retention is a focal point for any business operator, but what happens when a skilled employee moves on to a competitor?

A non-competition agreement can be a valuable tool for preserving your business's interests. This contract, entered by an employee and employer, may ensure that a worker does not join a competitor after termination.

5 Ways To Prevent Partnership Disputes

Partnerships are best cultivated with like-minded individuals. Finding someone with aligned growth strategies and management philosophies can equal an equation for success. Unfortunately, even successful business owners encounter disagreements. Disputes can not only be costly, but damage your hard-earned business. It is better to prevent them before they can ever erupt into costly litigation. Consider the following five ways to prevent partnership disputes.